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Thursday, May 14, 2020 | History

1 edition of Organic residue analysis and the first uses of pottery in the ancient Middle East found in the catalog.

Organic residue analysis and the first uses of pottery in the ancient Middle East

Michael W. Gregg

Organic residue analysis and the first uses of pottery in the ancient Middle East

by Michael W. Gregg

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Published by John and Erica Hedges Ltd. in Oxford .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. 61-75).

StatementMichael W. Gregg
SeriesBAR international series -- 2065, BAR international series -- 2065.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsDS56 .G74 2010
The Physical Object
Paginationviii, 98 p. :
Number of Pages98
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24426703M
ISBN 101407304739
ISBN 109781407304731
LC Control Number2010362758
OCLC/WorldCa559767292

View Organic Residues Analysis of Pottery Research Papers on for free.   On Thursday 23 March Ashley Tuck and Jess Tibber from the Wessex Archaeology Sheffield Office attended a Historic England Heritage Practice programme addressing Organic Residue Analysis (ORA) and Pottery Production Sites. It was a full day of talks and interactive sessions, chaired by the local Science Advisor Andy Hammon.

Early Iron Age cultures in eastern France imported Mediterranean pottery, as well as olive oil and wine, and may have appropriated Mediterranean feasting practices, according to a study by Maxime Rageot from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München and the University of Tübingen, and colleagues. Theory and Practice of Archaeological Residue Analysis, British Archaeological Reports International Series (Oxford: Archaeopress). Barnett, M.S. ‘ Luminescence dating of pottery from later prehistoric Britain ’, Archaeometry, 42 (2): –Cited by:

This book is an introductory manual that explains the basic concepts of chemistry behind scientific analytical techniques and that reviews their application to archaeology. It explains key terminology, outlines the procedures to be followed in order to produce good data, and describes the function of the basic instrumentation required to carry Cited by: Despite major environmental challenges, pottery was manufactured and used by Palaeo- and Neo-Eskimos in Alaska for millennia. To better understand why pottery was used by Alaskan hunter-gatherers, the authors have undertaken a number of site-based organic residue analyses that provide direct biomolecular and isotopic evidence for the contents of past : Thomas Farrell, Peter Jordan, Rick Knecht, Oliver Craig.


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Organic residue analysis and the first uses of pottery in the ancient Middle East by Michael W. Gregg Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Organic residue analysis and the first uses of pottery in the ancient Middle East. [Michael W Gregg]. In this dissertation, I discuss the role of organic residue analysis in identifying economic activities and subsistence practices associated with the first uses of pottery in the Middle East, and present the results of my analyses of potsherds recovered from 22 Neolithic and early Chalcolithic settlements dating between and cal by: 6.

Abstract (summary): In this dissertation, I discuss the role of organic residue analysis in identifying economic activities and subsistence practices associated with the first uses of pottery in the Middle East, and present the results of my analyses of potsherds recovered from 22 Neolithic and early Chalcolithic settlements dating between and cal BC.

Useful and Social Pots: residue analysis of Iron Age pottery. (this was not specific to a particular fabric or form of pottery), since this is the first time that ricinoleic acid has been found in prehistoric pottery residues from Britain. Ricinoleic acid is unusually abundant in castor oil, but can also be present in other plants in much.

The investigation of organic residues associated with archaeological pottery using modern analytical chemical methods began in the s. It was recognised early on that the analysis of lipids (i.e. fats, waxes and resins) preserved in surface residues or the fabric of single potsherds, representative of single vessels, was a powerful method for ascertaining pottery use, with a high degree of Cited by: The Tianluoshan pottery revealed a complex distribution of lipids not commonly encountered in organic residue analysis and markedly different from pottery residues from other East Asian early.

Earliest evidence of winemaking: Team discovers 8,year-old wine production in ancient Middle East by University of Toronto Base of Neolithic. This guidance was commissioned by Historic England and written by University of Bristol-based organic residue specialists, with contributions from the Universities of Bradford and York, in consultation with pottery specialists, museum curators, field archaeologists, local authority curators and Historic England.

Fig 1. Two ancient Roman amphoras rest atop a shipwreck h ceramic residue analysis, we can determine what these amphoras contained thousands of years ago. Introduction Ceramics are possibly the most abundant type of archaeological artifact there is, due to the ubiquity and durability of ional archaeological analysis of ceramics can provide a wealth of information.

Top image: This is base of Neolithic jar being prepared for sampling for residue analysis. (Image Credit: Judyta Olszewski) The article, originally titled ‘ Archaeologists find earliest evidence of winemaking: Discovery of 8,year-old wine production in ancient Middle East ’ was originally published on Science : Ancient-Origins.

Organic residue evidence for the processing of marine animal products in pottery vessels from the pre-colonial archaeological site of Kasteelberg D east, South Africa Article May   Organic Residue Analysis and the First Uses of Pottery in the Ancient Middle East.

Oxford: John and Erica Hedges Limited. British Archaeological Reports, International Series, Vol. organic residue analysis in pottery use studies have appeared (e.g., Robins ; Jones ; Heron et al. Definition and Classification of Organic Residues The term organic residue has been used widely by archae ologists and archaeological scientists to describe a variety of amor phous organic remains found at archaeological sites.

Craig, OE, Heron, CP, Willis, A, Yusof, NNHA & Taylor, GOrganic residue analysis of pottery vessels. in The Early Neolithic on the Great Hungarian Plain: investigations o f the Körös culture site of Ecsegfalva University of Cardiff.

In any event, pottery came to Europe from the Middle East during the seventh millennium BCE. Influenced by techniques arriving from present-day Syria and Iraq, the Greek region of Thessalia is the first region of Europe known to have made pottery, around BCE.

Davide Tanasi et al. 1H-1H NMR 2D-TOCSY, ATR FT-IR and SEM-EDX for the identification of organic residues on Sicilian prehistoric pottery. Microchemical Journal, published online Aug Theory and practice of archaeological residue analysis Many are working to understand the organic residues found, with a variety of techniques, in archaeological artifacts.

After a successful symposium on ' Nomads in Archaeology ', during the 69th Annual Meeting of the Society of American Archaeology (Montreal, April ), it was decided to.

Organic residues associated with Neolithic pottery from two Late Neolithic sites, Paliambela and Makriyalos (Northern Greece), were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

The study aimed at identifying the origin of the tar used for waterproofing and gluing broken pots. Reference tars were prepared in laboratory conditions by pyrolysis of the bark from three tree Cited by: In relation to this pottery from Tell Sabi Abyad contributed to an extensive investigation, involving more than vessels from 25 Neolithic sites in the Near East and Southeastern Europe, in which organic residues were used to document the early evolution of milk use by prehistoric farmers (Evershed et al., ).

The investigation included Cited by: Analysis should be carried out by, or under the supervision of, a qualified and experienced specialist. Pieces may also be selected for illustration and scientific analysis, e.g.

for fabric characterisation, residue analysis or dating. Analysis will usually lead to the creation of a File Size: KB. The final category of residue is the absorbed residue, which is by far the most commonly occurring in pottery. Of the more than fifty or so pottery assemblages we have now investigated, only c.

10 per cent have failed to yield useful absorbed organic residues. It was (1) the widespread occurrence of absorbed residues, (2) their protected nature.secondary product exploitation through lipid residue analysis at Late Neolithic Tell Sabi Abyad (Syria).

Journal of Archaeological Science, 64, results of the organic residue analyses of these same vessels. The results are interpreted in the context of the functional uses of.

Carbon isotope analysis of residues from excavated pottery indicated that people 7, years ago in what is now Libya had milk and other dairy products as part of their diet.